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Posted in Family, Home, Moving

How to move house with a dog

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So the time has finally come for you and your furry friend to move into a new house, and begin your next big adventure. Not only is this a fresh start, but you can reap all the benefits of your new place, like more garden space, especially if you’re upgrading to a larger home. But before you move into your new abode, it’s important to make sure your pup gets settled in too. Here are a few tips and tricks you can do when moving , so that your dog is comfortable in their new environment. Dog appeasing pheromones Pheromones are chemical signals that dogs release and can function as an ‘invisible communication’. For example, a dog appeasing pheromone is a special type of pheromone that’s secreted by female dogs after they’ve had puppies. This scent is to help their puppies feel safe, secure, and comfortable. When you’re moving into a new home, you can purchase plug-in diffusers or dog collars that contain the dog appeasing pheromone, which creates a calming sensation for your pooch. If you’re moving into somewhere new, make sure you do this 24-hours before, so that when your dog is exploring their new home, they’ll experience the full effect. Stick to the same routine Another great trick to make sure your dog stays comfortable in their new home is to follow to your usual routine. By sticking to the same walking, feeding, and resting time, it will provide them with a greater sense of security and control over their new surroundings. Simply put, it’s trying to make it appear as normal as possible, so your dog won’t grow worried about the change of scene. Clean your new home Although this may seem obvious, cleaning your house ensures that your home is free of any germs, clutter, and improves the safety of your dog. This will allow your dog to feel more comfortable when they do get the chance to explore your new home. As most dog owners know, dogs are super sensitive to scent, so double check that everything is clean and tidy at ‘dog height’, so they can settle in much faster. Leave your dog with someone On moving day, it can be quite hectic for many people. This is because items will be moved and your home will look very different without all of your belongings there to give it that homely feel. That’s why when you’re moving house with a dog, it may be a good idea to leave them with a family member or friend for a few hours. This not only enables you to focus on moving out, but it also ensures your dog doesn’t become stressed by the upheaval. What’s more, when the time comes for you to move into your new property, try and leave your dog with someone if it’s possible. This gives you a chance to properly organise your home, create a space that your dog will recognise and feel familiar in, with items such as the sofa. Once you’re all moved in, allow the dog to explore your new property, this is a great opportunity for them to get settled How long will it take for your dog to adapt? Continue to follow these tips and slowly but surely, you should see an improvement in your dog or puppy’s behaviour. It may take up to a few weeks for them to feel 100% secure in their new environment, but this also depends on your dog’s temperament. At Space Station, we have a range of quality storage units available across London, Birmingham, and the Midlands. So, if you’re moving house soon, you can be certain that your valuables are as safe as houses, thanks to our brilliant 24-hour CCTV and secure PIN access. If you need any help, our staff are on site every day to give you a hand with anything you need. Unsure what size storage you require? Use our handy storage calculator, which will help you work out exactly what size unit you need. It’s simple.

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Posted in Decluttering, Family, Help Guides, Home, Moving, Organising, Storage, Tidying

Expert tips for clearing out sentimental clutter

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In the process of moving homes, living with new people and the general chaos of life, we often lose track of belongings and become swamped in clutter. Seventy per cent of Brits have admitted to keeping hold of belongings they no longer need. Some of the top items Brits hold onto include family photos, books and clothes. Explaining why we keep items, resilience coach and author, Natalie Reed, comments: “The attachment can be as a result of habit- doing what you’ve always done and not questioning whether or not this serves you financially, emotionally or energetically. “You may even be unaware that you are doing it in the same way that you become used to a dog smell around the house or become familiar with your untidiness.” However, the clear-out is usually more challenging than anticipated, especially when those belongings have sentimental values behind them. To help organise your clutter, we’ve put together our top tips for taking the stress out of the clear out. Divide into three main piles Before you start clearing anything out, place three boxes or bin bags (whatever takes your fancy) labelled ‘keep’, ‘throw’ and ‘donate’ in a central location. These three dividers will be key to making your de-cluttering process as easy as possible. Having a donate pile, for a lot of people, will make the idea of throwing an item out less daunting, as it will be going to a good home instead of the rubbish bin. It’s great for items such as clothes or homeware which aren’t past their best but no longer serve a purpose in your home. Not only will it make a new owner happy, but it’s more environmentally friendly. Does it have a home or a purpose? When deciding if you should keep an item or not, ask yourself two key questions. Does it have a purpose? It seems self-explanatory, but a lot of the time we keep items that we’re just not using anymore. If you get a lot of use out of it, keep it. If you haven’t used it in the past six months and it’s going to sit collecting dust, get rid. Does it have a home? Especially when looking at more decorative belongings, unless you have somewhere permanent to keep it, it’s probably one for the recycling. There’s nothing worse than constantly tripping up over household items. Read says: “Ask yourself, how does holding onto this object serve you? What does letting go of it bring up for you? What benefits would you have from reducing your clutter? If you made a decision, what would that be helping you to overcome? This will help you to be clearer about what you want from your life and take steps to move towards it.” Leave the sentimental items until last Start with the items that you know what to do with, or that you’re less attached to. Items such as clothes, old technology or kids’ toys are going to be easier to part with because it’s about how much use you get out of them. When it comes to photos, books and jewellery it gets a bit trickier. These belongings tend to have more sentimental value behind them. Leave them until last so you can see how much you’ve already got rid of and compare it to how much space is left. Typically, this part will take longer as well, so it will feel less overwhelming being the only job left. Create an organised storage system Now you’ve got a pile of things to keep, it all needs putting away. To make the most of the space you have and ensure you don’t begin to gather clutter all over again, keep everything well organised. Labelled boxes are always a foolproof method of storage, dividing them into item categories such as ‘children’, ‘holiday’ or ‘technology’. Then they can be stored under beds, in wardrobes, attics or garages, depending on how easily they need to be accessed. For photos, keep them neatly stored in labelled photo albums so they are easy to find and reminisce upon. If you find yourself struggling for space at home, we have a range of home storage options available.

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